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Published: 10.04.2017
The 1937 Lincolns were stylish automobiles
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

The Lincoln brand was an early trendsetter for luxury vehicles that were affordable for much of the domestic auto market. Starting in 1937, the now merged Ford-Lincoln brand produced some of the most elegant autos of that era.

Published: 09.25.2017
John DeLorean was a true car person
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of The National Automotive History Collection

Despite having his career overshadowed by legal troubles later in life, John DeLorean was a highly talented engineer and designer having advanced his way up General Motors' corporate ladder.

Published: 09.18.2017
Remembering a concept car legend, the Mako Shark II
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of Robert Tate's collection/General Motors Archives

When GM first introduced the now iconic show car, the Mako Shark II, its highly innovative styling and design features made a major splash among automotive enthusiasts.

Published: 09.10.2017
Unit body construction impacted 1960 Chrysler models
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

The automotive industry has a long tradition of being at the forefront of technology and innovation when t comes to styling and manufacturing - and the year 1960 was no different. The introduction of the unit-body construction offered consumers smooth rides and more driving comfort.

Published: 09.05.2017
Before cars, there were bicycles
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

Not long after the revolutionary invention of the bicycle, many Americans were racing each other on roads and on wooden tracks in events that would last up to six days.

Published: 08.27.2017
Looking back at the Pontiac Ghost Car
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of The National Automotive History Collection

Introduced at the 1939-1940 New York World's Fair, the Pontiac Ghost Car stands as a highly unique and significant part of our automotive heritage as the country's first-ever transparent made automobile.

Published: 08.22.2017
Automotive manufacturing before the computer age
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

The moving assembly line at Henry Ford's famed Highland Park plant was considered revolutionary for its time. Generations later, the dawn of the digital age would inspire a new revolution in the automotive industry. Read more in our latest Story of the Week from Robert Tate!

Published: 08.13.2017
1937 LaSalle marked high point for brand
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

New styling and engineering features introduced for the 1937 LaSalle promoted the highest sales volume historically for GM's luxury brand. The success, however, didn't last long as LaSalle as a stand-alone product was discontinued by 1940.

Published: 08.06.2017
1972 was one of the great years for Pontiac design
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of Robert Tate's collection

In addition to the iconic GTO models produced for 1972, Pontiac produced other American classics that year including the Firebird Trans Am, Grand Prix and others.

Published: 08.02.2017
Rosie the Riveter and the Yankee Air Museum
By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images courtesy of the Yankee Air Museum

The Yankee Ar Museum in Ypsilanti Township, MI, does a great job preserving and honoring the legacy of all the Rosie the Riveters - including Mary Kooistra Otto, whose granddaughter now works at the museum.

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