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Published: 01.21.2015
Remembering the Legacy of Raymond Loewy, Industrial Designer
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

Mr. Raymond Loewy, a very gifted and talented designer began his industrial design journey in Paris, France. He was educated at the University of Paris in 1910 and later received his engineering degree in 1918. As his career continued, he would later be known as the “father of industrial design”. His early career was filled with everything from window designs for Macy’s and Saks Fifth Avenue to becoming a fashion illustrator for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. Mr.

Published: 01.13.2015
How Margaret (Peg) Sauer Inspired the World
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/ Researcher
Images: Courtesy of Margaret E. Sauer Portfolio / The Collection of Julie Sabit, archived by Doug Didia

There comes a time in our lives when a special person inspires us in so many different ways that their history should be documented. This is the story of Margaret (Peg) Sauer. The world knew her as one of the famous “Damsels of Design,” a talented young lady from General Motors’ early days of styling.

Published: 01.07.2015
1959 Cadillac Iconic Symbol of The 1950's
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: Courtesy of Robert Tate's collection

One of the most fascinating car designs of the 1950’s was General Motors’ Cadillac 1959 models. The models were designed under the direction of the late Bill Mitchell, Mr. Chuck Jordan, and Mr. Dave Holls. The 1959 GM line of automobile designs was considered a breakthrough from previous designs of General Motors’ past.

Published: 12.30.2014
Mr. Alex Buchan: The Gifted Bronze Sculptor
By: Robert Tate

A local Michigan artist, Mr. Alex Buchan, is known as one of the most successful and gifted sculptors in the world. His fascinating bronze sculptured masterpieces have been showcased across the country. His journey began about forty years ago when he started as a sculpture and designer at General Motors Interior Design Studio located in Warren, Michigan. During that time, his responsibilities included the transformation of designer drawings into three-dimensional renderings in clay.

Published: 12.24.2014
Remembering The Design of the Chevrolet Monza GT
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: Courtesy of Robert Tate's collection

The experimental Corvair Monza GT by Chevrolet, which had a very clean aerodynamic style, was first introduced in Elkhart Lake Wisconsin at a sports car event. The specially designed General Motors model was called one of the “Idea” cars. The model was also featured at the New York Show Coliseum and would later become a big hit with the public.

Published: 12.16.2014
Remembering the Michigan Central Station
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: Courtesy of the Burton Historical Collection

The historical Michigan Central Station Terminal opened to the public on December 26, 1913 and for many years was the travel gateway to the city of Detroit and other popular cities. Hundreds upon thousands of travelers each day would pass through the ticket windows. They could listen to the sounds of departing trains or say “good bye” to loved ones as they left for the war. Some would travel on special occasions to Chicago to see family members. The Michigan Central Station is located at 2405 West Vernor near downtown Detroit.

Published: 12.09.2014
The Packard Plant: A History of Memories
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/ Researcher
Images: Courtesy of The National Automotive History Collection & Dr. Gary Gagliardi (Today's Packard Factory image)

In the early days of Detroit's history, the Packard Motor Car Company was one of the first automotive companies that helped move the city of Detroit forward. The Packard Motor Car Company started its journey in the late 1800's with Warren Packard, James Ward Packard, and William Doud Packard. In 1854, Warren along with his brother John R and uncle Dr. Daniel B. Packard established Packard & Company which was located in Greenville, Pennsylvania and later, the Packard Hardware Company.

Published: 12.02.2014
1935 Ford
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: Courtesy of The National Automotive History Collection

For many, the 1930’s is often associated with the great depression. But in the automotive world, even in these times, Ford Motor Company was manufacturing stylish and appealing products. During 1935, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, Mr. Henry Ford, and his son Edsel were responsible for the production of many great Ford products in the automotive and truck industry. For more than 40 years, Mr. Henry Ford had been considered an impactful figure not only in Detroit but also in the world.

Published: 11.25.2014
The Plymouth XNR: Concept Car of 1960
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/ Researcher
Images: Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection

The XNR was a remarkable show car that was introduced by the Chrysler Corporation in 1960. The name XNR was derived from the name of Mr. Virgil Exner, who was Chief Stylist of Chrysler design. Designed on a Plymouth Valiant chassis, the Plymouth XNR concept model was first introduced to the public on March 1, 1960.

Published: 11.18.2014
Richard Petty: Racing Legend
By: Robert Tate, Automotive Historian/Researcher
Images: The National Automotive History Collection

Richard Petty, a famous race car driver can be looked upon as the face of automotive racing in our history books and is considered to be a legend among racing fans. Born on July 2, 1937, Richard Petty was a second generation driver.

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